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The Ins & Outs of Engineering Recruitment

Written by Kimberley Startup | January 31, 2013 | 2 Comments
Engineering recruitment (2)A survey which analysed a search index of over 500,000 job vacancies has revealed the engineering sector has been buoyant during 2012 with average salaries increasing by 6% over the past 6 months.
Predicted to continue booming in the first half of 2013, the engineering industry has become a tempting choice for job seekers offering a diverse set of career paths in which you can pursue.
From aerospace, food production and beer brewing, to subsea, hydraulics and race engineering – there are great opportunities facing today’s engineering professional as a result of rapidly changing technologies.
But what engineering jobs were most in demand during 2012 and what’s in store for the year ahead?
Research conducted by webrecruit looked into all engineering vacancies worked on during 2012 compared to 2011.
Broken down into sectors covering everything from aviation, structural, CAD and controls to electrical, mechanical, hydraulics and sales engineering, here is what we found.

Growth rate by discipline - engineeringThe engineering sectors that witnessed an increase in demand between 2011 and 2012 included:

– Aerospace & aviation
– Controls
– Electrical design
– Electronics
– Hydraulics
– Industrial
– Oil, gas, utilities & energy
– R&D
– Sales engineering
– Graduate roles

 

Engineering job sectors that witnessed a decline incluThe decline of disciplines - engineeringded:

– CAD (without mechanical and electrical)
– Civil, construction and structural
– CNC
– Commissioning & installation
– Electrical
– Health & safety
– HVAC
– Maintenance & service
– Mechanical
– Mechanical design
– Quality
– Subsea & marine

 

And those that remained the same, included:

– Manufacturing
– Process engineering, and
– Surveying & estimating
So what does this mean for 2013?
Whilst the demand for engineering talent seems promising, reports are already revealing that candidates that would fit these professions are in short supply. As such, initiatives are already taking place, such as increased apprenticeships, to try tackling the problem.
But if you want to prove your mettle and develop a career in engineering, whatever your qualifications, age or sex, there’s never been a greater time to consider. And starting salaries are among some of the best in the UK.
Consider apprenticeships, Open University or volunteering as a route into the profession. It’s also worth joining institutions, such as the Institution of Engineering & Technology for careers advice, as well as training help and mentorship.
webrecruit works with some of the UK’s largest engineering companies. Check out our latest jobs here or register your CV with us and get our latest jobs emailed to you.

2 thoughts on “The Ins & Outs of Engineering Recruitment

  1. Andy on Reply

    It’s really amazing that R&D as a whole is on the incline, while what I’d imagine to be subsets thereof (CAD, mechanical design, etc) were on the decline. I wonder how that is?

  2. Pingback: CA Oil & Gas Blog | Attention African Engineers: YOUR sector is increasing in demand

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